UW-Madison OT Program- PhD Program Description

OT student doing research with child
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CONTACTING US

Main Office

Occupational Therapy
School of Education
UW-Madison
2120 Medical Sciences Center
1300 University Avenue
MadisonWI  53706-1691

Tel: 608/262-2936
Fax: 608/262-1639

Email: otoffice@education.wisc.edu
or by contact form
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Program Description

MS and PhD in Kinesiology: Occupational Science Track

Faculty and Graduate Advisors

Synopsis

Occupational Science is the theory and body of knowledge that provides the foundation for the conduct of occupational therapy. Occupational Science draws on disciplines from the social, biological and medical sciences. To provide grounding for investigations of how occupational therapy and engagement in activities and occupations promotes human health and well being. View the M.S. & Ph.D. track curriculum, admissions requirements, and tuition, scholarships, financial aid

Purpose of M.S.

The M.S. degree in the Occupational Science Track is an advanced post-professional degree offered to students who have graduated from an accredited program in occupational therapy or a related field. Program emphasis is on the understanding of theories underlying occupational science. Students conduct research and develop advanced knowledge in a specific area of concentration within occupational science. Completion of 16 credits beyond the baccalaureate degree is required and includes seminars in human occupation and health, courses that emphasize research theory and design, electives focusing on a particular area of study, and completion of a thesis.

Purpose of Ph.D.

The Ph.D. in the Occupational Science Track prepares occupational therapists or related rehabilitation professionals to serve as researchers and educators who are able contribute to the understanding of the theoretical and empirical relationships between occupation, physiological health, and psychological well-being. Graduate students work closely with an academic mentor to pursue research on issues that will expand our current understanding of occupational science and its application to life-span development and health. Completion of 54 credits beyond the baccalaureate degree is required and includes seminars in human occupation and health, courses that emphasize research theory and design, electives focusing on a particular area of study, and completion of a dissertation.

Faculty Research

Occupational science graduate faculty conduct scholarly activity on a wide range of topics and using diverse methodologies. Research is conducted in a broad range of contexts ranging from laboratories with technologically advanced data gathering and analysis equipment to whole communities.   Prospective students are encouraged to review faculty web pages and publications to identify a potential academic mentor.

Facilities


The occupational therapy faculty engages in research activities across a range of facilities on the UW- Madison campus and the community at large.  

In addition to research facilities within the Kinesiology department and the Occupational Therapy program, The UW-Madison is host to an extensive network of research centers and programs. The Occupational Science graduate faculty hold affiliations or have collaboration with other investigators and centers across campus.

The UW-Madison is host to an extensive network of research centers and programs.

The Occupational Science graduate faculty hold affiliations or collaborate with other investigators in the following research environments:

Wisconsin Alzheimer;  Alzheimer Disease Research Center
Institute on aging
Biomedical Engineering
Neuroradiology
CCHE Collaborative Center for Health Equity
UW- Center for Urban and Population Health – Milwaukee

The Waisman Center for Human Development, Developmental Disabilities and Neurodegenerative Diseases is one of 14 facilities in the nation established to further the understanding, treatment, and prevention of human development and developmental disabilities. Investigators housed at the Waisman Center are from such diverse fields as molecular, genetic, communicative, cognitive, social and affective sciences. 

The Harlow Primate Laboratory and Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, in combination, comprise the largest primate facility associated with an academic institution in the United States. The facility includes faculty, technical and graduate student office space, animal housing space, behavioral testing facilities and apparatus, and laboratory space for collection, storage, and analysis of biological samples.  & 

The UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research goal is to is to create an environment that transforms research into a continuum from investigation through discovery and to translation into real-life community practice, thereby linking even the most basic research to practical improvements in human health. Its Community Academic Partnership assists investigators in making connections to local community partners. 

The Wisconsin Center for Education Research provides a dynamic environment where some of the country's leading scholars conduct basic and applied education research.

Resources for Graduate Student Research

As a world-class research university, the UW-Madison has extensive resources to support research across and beyond campus. The UW-Madison Libraries are the 11th largest research collection in North America. There are over 20,000 journals available electronically, as well as numerous e-books. Many of these resources are accessed through more than 650 databases. The UW Libraries provide a wealth of support services including electronic equipment check-out (e.g. laptop computers, projectors, digital cameras and tape recorders), computer labs, software training and support, poster printing, and access to citation management software. Librarians are available for consultation through real-time chat, instant messaging, email, phone and in person.

Graduate students also have access to extensive analytical and statistical software through the Social Sciences Computing Cooperative. Advanced technology permits students to create, store and back-up their work from virtually any environment with internet availability.


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