Course Descriptions

OT student doing research with child
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Course Descriptions

ANAT 622: Human Anatomy-Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy 
Gross human anatomy involving complete dissection of the human body. Special emphasis is placed on the musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous systems, and living subject and surface anatomy.

KINES 508: Functinal Neuroanatomy 
For occupational therapy and physical therapy majors. Motor and sensory systems under normal and altered conditions.

OT 610: Professional Skills I:  Professional Practice in OT 
This course introduces entry-level occupational therapy students to the foundations and basic tenets of occupational therapy and the process and domain of the profession. Topics include the history, development, and parameters of the profession; the “Occupational Therapy Framework” and selected models of practice; roles, behaviors and responsibilities of occupational therapists; professional values and ethics; clinical reasoning; the process of designing and documenting client-centered, occupation-based interventions; therapeutic use of activity and occupation; activity and task analysis; and safety in occupational therapy practice.

OT 611: Professional Practice in Occupational Therapy-II 
This course applies knowledge from clinical, theoretical, and research literature on the use of communication and interpersonal interaction in occupational therapy practice. Emphasis will be placed on clinical reasoning as it relates to group processes, cultural competency, and the phenomenological experience of persons with disability.

OT 612:  Professional Skills III:  Organization & Management in OT Practice
This course covers the principles and practices of organization and management and their application in both traditional and innovative occupational therapy practice settings. Knowledge of the external and internal forces acting on the health, education, and social service systems, in which occupational therapists typically work, provides the foundation for developing skills as a team member, collaborator, supervisor, manager, entrepreneur, or advocate for occupational therapy services. Students gain knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for effective management and supervision, for attending to fiduciary responsibilities, and for addressing legal and ethical concerns.

OT 613:  Professional Skills IV:  Community-Based OT Practice 
This course incorporates the program’s view of occupation as involving active participation in culturally-relevant and meaningful activities throughout the life span and engages students in the exploration of the concepts of occupational alienation, deprivation, marginalization and imbalance. During the semester, students develop an understanding of these concepts and their relationship to achieving occupational justice for diverse populations. Through the development of a community-based program grant, students express their understanding of the power of occupation as a transformative agent for the identified population.

OT 620:  Occupation-Based Theory & Practice 
This course focuses on theories and research on human occupations. Occupation is defined as active participation in person-centered culturally relevant and meaningful patterns of activity which occur across the lifespan in the context of a person’s environment. The therapeutic use of occupation is fundamental to occupational therapy practice. Research pertaining to the form, function and meaning of daily occupations for the individual and society, and the implications for occupational therapy practice will be discussed.

OT 621: Assessment of Occupational Participation 
An overview of skills required for the assessment of occupational participation in a variety of contexts, ages, and populations. Students learn to critically evaluate: 1) assessment tools and evaluation methods based on evidence from research, current models of practice, and clinical utility, and 2) multi-dimensional demands of activities and occupations, client factors and process skills related to occupational performance, and the role of environmental context in the occupational analysis process.

OT 622:  Infant & Childhood Occupation & Therapeutic Intervention 
This course will describe the foundations of pediatric occupational therapy practice including theory and core concepts; models of practice and service delivery; the assessment and treatment process; and alterations in performance components, skills, and participation for children with various disabilities. Using multiple case studies, students will engage in diagnostic reasoning and evaluation, research disability trajectories and occupational participation, and create appropriate goals and treatment plans.

OT 623:  Adolescent & Young Adult Occupations & Therapeutic Interventions 
During this course, students will enhance their knowledge of typical adolescent/young adult development and learn to recognize signs or symptoms of occupational dysfunction. Students will develop skill in designing occupational therapy interventions appropriate for specific conditions associated with this age group.

OT 624:  Middle & Late Adulthood Occupations & Therapeutic Interventions 
Knowledge of typical occupational roles for mid- and later life will provide a foundation for understanding the physical, psychosocial, temporal and environmental conditions that may impede occupational participation. Students will develop skills in occupational therapy assessment and intervention for conditions commonly associated with the aging process.

OT 625:  Level-I Fieldwork:  Infants & Children 
This course provides occupational therapy students with a clinical experience in the use of therapeutic intervention to facilitate participation of children with disabilities and their families in everyday occupations within their community.  In this clerkship students are expected to apply appropriate theory and principles to assessment and intervention, to conduct standardized assessment and observations according to appropriate guidelines, to collaborate and consult with stakeholders, to design and implement a therapeutic intervention, and to document and evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention.

OT 626:  Level-I Fieldwork:  Adolescent & Young Adults 
This course provides occupational therapy students with a clinical experience involving occupational therapy practice with adolescents and young adults. In this Level-I experience, students are expected to apply appropriate theory and principles to assessment and the planning and carrying out of occupational therapy interventions with adolescents and young adults with disabilities.

OT 627:  Level-I Fieldwork:  Adults & Elders 
This course provides occupational therapy students with a clinical experience involving occupational therapy practice with adults thirty-five years old and up. In this Level-I experience, students are expected to apply appropriate theory and principles to assessment and the planning and carrying out of occupational therapy interventions with adults with disabilities.

OT 629: Medical Lectures for Occupational Therapy 
Introduction to the etiology of developmental, orthopedic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders, as well as medical, surgical, and therapeutic approaches commonly used to address them. Course material is presented by medical faculty, practitioners, and clinicians at the University of Wisconsin medical school and hospitals.

OT 662:  Level II Fieldwork-A 
This course is a twelve-week supervised practical application of occupational therapy in an approved practice setting.  The student is required to complete a minimum of 24 weeks full-time in order to pass fieldwork and be eligible to take the certification examination.  The student begins fieldwork after all academic coursework has been successfully completed.

OT 664:  Level II Fieldwork-B 
This course is a twelve-week supervised practical application of occupational therapy in an approved practice setting.  The student is required to complete a minimum of 24 weeks full-time in order to pass fieldwork and be eligible to take the certification examination. The student begins fieldwork after all academic coursework has been successfully completed.

OT 671:  Scientific Inquiry in OT I:  Evidence-Based Practice 
This course is designed to inform students regarding the role and creation of practiced-based evidence in occupational therapy. The course covers the concepts, methods, and strategies related to evidence-based practice. The goal of the course is to support students in the development of critical reading and writing  skills with particular relevance to understanding human occupation and the practice of occupational therapy through scientific inquiry.  This course is the first in the sequence leading to the development of a proposal and completion of a research project.

OT 672:  Scientific Inquiry in OT II:  Methods of Inquiry 
This course is the second in the four course Scientific Inquiry sequence supporting the Evidence Based Practice Strand of the OT curriculum. This and other courses are designed to support the development and use of evidence in occupational therapy practice. This course provides an overview of research and evaluation procedures that have particular relevance to understanding human occupation and the practice of occupational therapy through scientific inquiry.

OT 673:  Scientific Inquiry in OT III:  Data Collection/Analysis 
This course supports the development of a research proposal and the skills needed to implement a research project. This course builds on the skills developed through pre-requisite coursework as well as courses completed in the first year of the MSOT program (OT 671, OT 672 & OT 621). Through a series of lectures, small group discussions and lab activities students are guided through the development of a research proposal and analysis of data.

OT 674:  Scientific Inquiry in OT IV:  Scientific Writing for Publication 
In this course students complete the collection and analysis of their data as well as the development of a final paper and poster presentations of their study findings. The skills addressed in this course include data entry and management, data analysis and preparation of tables and figures and the integration of the findings with existing literature. The emphasis on scientific writing and presentation emphasizes the importance of contribution to the OT literature and continuing education programs.

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